Category: <span>Book Reviews</span>

A review of “Women, Race, & Class” by Angela Davis was published in 1981 and analyzes the individual histories and intersections of sexism, racism, and classism in America. The book primarily focuses on the women’s liberation movement and provides an overview of the movement’s complete timeline as well as in-depth coverage of specific eras.

Book Reviews

On a basic level, “Ghana Must Go” by Taiye Selasi is a book about family and identity. A man named Kweku Sai, his wife Fola, and their four children. Kweku is from Ghana and Fola is from Nigeria, the two meet in America and get married. It’s a very engrossing read about how pride, fear, and secrets can steal our joy and cut us off from having and maintaining meaningful relationships.

Book Reviews

“Negroes and the Gun” by Nicholas Johnson grabbed my attention from the beginning. While the book includes stats, figures, and general events much of the history of armed Black self-defense is told through the experiences of historical figures. In some instances, I’d heard about these events but the author takes special care in describing the mood and providing details. This allows you to imagine yourself witnessing these events in your mind’s eye. What could have been a boring topic springs to life because it’s told through these riveting stories and personal accounts.

Book Reviews

On a basic level, “The Spook Who Sat By the Door” is a book about Dan Freeman, a man who becomes the first Black officer in the CIA and later uses his knowledge to work with members of a gang in Chicago. But, on a deeper level Dan’s journey is used to explore the question of what’s the best way forward for Black people during this early period of integration.

Book Reviews

I don’t take the phrase lightly but I would deem “Why I’m No Longer Talking to White People About Race” by Reni Eddo-Lodge to be a modern classic. It is flawless from beginning to end, worth reading, and likely worth re-reading in the future to gauge if and/or how things have changed. I highly recommend reading the book.

Book Reviews