Category: Book Reviews

“A Particular Kind of Black Man” by Tope Folarin tells the story of Tunde Akinola, the son of Nigerian immigrants who settled in Utah. Released in 2019, A Particular Kind of Black Man is the first full-length title from Folarin. The story is not exactly autobiographical but is influenced by some aspects and experiences from the author’s life.

Book Reviews

A review and discussion of the book “Becoming” by Michelle Obama. “Becoming” to some degree provides a blueprint for learning to not limit your aspirations or question your suitability for success. This mental shift can set you on a path for moving beyond the parameters and low expectations with which society might try to constrain you.

Book Reviews

“Forty Million Dollar Slaves” by William C. Rhoden tells the history of Black athletes navigating the racist efforts to limit their participation in sports. Largely focused on athletes in America, the book begins in the 1700s and continues into the 2000s. Through the stories of various athletes, Rhoden presents his case for how organized Black athleticism as a means of control was first cultivated on plantations and shows how that mentality continues into the present.

Book Reviews

A review of “Under the Udala Trees” by Chinelo Okparanta, which begins during the Biafra War in Nigeria in the late 1960s. The book tells the story of Ijeoma, a middle-class girl living with her parents while trying to survive air raids and food shortages. And her journey to define and accept herself following the end of the war.

Book Reviews

A review of “The Mother of Black Hollywood”, a memoir in which Jenifer Lewis tells the story of her life from being a young kid growing up in Kinloch, MO to a working actress in New York and Los Angeles.

Book Reviews