Noire Histoir Posts

“The African Americans: Many Rivers to Cross” is a 2013 documentary presented and written by Henry Louis Gates Jr. which tells the history of Black people in America. Over six episodes, Gates and other historians relate the events and experiences that shaped the lives of Black people. It ventures back to Africa before the first slaves landed on the shores of the Americas up to the present of a few years ago. In some regards, the documentary is like a visual companion piece to Before the Mayflower.

Movie Reviews

If you’re interested in learning about the mother of modern African literature and the first female African novelist to publish a book in English, then my Flora Nwapa Black History Short is for you.

Historical Profile

“Sugar” by Bernice McFadden is the story of a world-weary prostitute who moves to a small town in Arkansas and forms an unlikely and transformational friendship with her neighbor. Sugar Lacey arrives in Bigelow, Arkansas looking for, if not change, then a break from her life. Strutting into town sporting makeup, wigs, high heels, and vibrant big city clothing makes the local women uncomfortable with Sugar’s presence. But one woman, Pearl Taylor, makes it her duty to befriend Sugar when she moves into the house next door.

Book Reviews

If you’re interested in learning about a chemist who synthesized medications from plants used to treat glaucoma and rheumatoid arthritis then my Percy Lavon Julian Black History Short is for you.

Historical Profile

“A Raisin in the Sun” is a 1961 film adapted from Lorraine Hansberry’s 1959 play about the fictional Younger family. The Youngers are a Black family living on Chicago’s Southside and thus far their dreams of a better life have been held in check by poverty and racism. As the family’s matriarch awaits a possibly life-changing insurance check resulting from her husband’s death, her son and daughter have hopes of using the money to pursue their dreams. The story follows the lives of the Youngers for a few weeks and explores their current lives versus their aspirations.

Movie Reviews