Noire Histoir Posts

“The True History of Paradise” by Margaret Cezair-Thompson in a sense tells the history of Jamaica through the lives and experiences of a fictional character and her family. The book opens in 1981 when political violence tore Jamaica apart and created a state of emergency that resulted in many people fleeing the country. Jean Landing is a young woman of mixed heritage from a financially comfortable and politically connected family. Devastated by the violence that now plagues the country, Jean plans to emigrate to America. When her sister dies right as she prepares to leave, the loss of her family member and beloved country causes her to look back over her life and we also get some insight into the lives of her ancestors.

Book Reviews

If you’re interested in learning about the artist who was commissioned to paint First Lady Michelle Obama’s official portrait, then my Amy Sherald Black History Facts profile is for you.

Black History Profile

“Through a Lens Darkly” is a 2014 documentary directed by Thomas Allen Harris about the history of Black people in America both in front and behind the lens. The film explores how the camera has been used at various times to shape the public image of Black America. Beginning during slavery and ending in the recent past, the documentary presents and discusses photos of Black people from through the decades but also presents short profiles of notable Black photographers.

Movie Reviews

If you’re interested in learning about the civil rights attorney who represented Rosa Parks and Claudette Colvin as well as the victims of the Tuskegee experiment, then my Fred Gray Black History Facts profile is for you.

Black History Profile

“White Rage” by Carol Anderson examines the reality that Black efforts at progress and achievement are often met with resistance and a retrenchment of obstacles. Since the Civil Rights Movement and especially during riots, much has been made of Black people angrily lashing out against injustices and a lack of access to resources. Instead of focusing on the issues that lead to protests and riots, greater attention is often placed on what’s referred to as “Black rage” and calls for adherence to respectability politics. But looking back through American history, Anderson examines America’s historic and present “White rage”, the systemic oppression of Black progress.

Book Reviews