Category: <span>Book Reviews</span>

A review of “The Underground Railroad Records” by William Still, an important book to read. A vitally important to read because the book shares the experiences of people who escaped or attempted to escape slavery by the Underground Railroad. It recounts some of the experiences of people who passed through the Philadelphia area and had some contact with the Vigilance Committee of the Pennsylvania Anti-Slavery Society, of which William Still was the chairman.

Book Reviews

A review of “A Kind of Freedom” by Margaret Wilkerson Sexton, the story of three family members which provides a glimpse into issues such as Jim Crow, drug addiction, and mass incarceration that have plagued the Black community.

Book Reviews

“I Put a Spell on You” is an autobiography about the life and career of Eunice Waymon, a singer, songwriter, and pianist known professionally as Nina Simone. Unlike typical autobiographies, you get the sense that the book was likely created from interviews that she had with her co-author. And because of that, the book has a very informal tone that makes you feel like you’re sitting down and having a regular conversation with her as she tells you her life story.

Book Reviews

“My Life with Earth, Wind & Fire is an autobiography by Maurice White written in collaboration with Herb Powell. The book tells the story of White’s early life growing up in Memphis and his eventual move to Chicago where he decided to pursue music as a career. Fans of Earth Wind & Fire might particularly enjoy learning about the vision that went into forming the group, the making of various songs, and how it was all translated for live stage shows. The book would also be a great pick for people who are interested in music history and/or the music industry though they might not necessarily be fans of the band.

Book Reviews

“The Sun Does Shine” is an autobiography written by Anthony Ray Hinton about his life and experience as a wrongfully convicted man. At the age of 29, Hinton was arrested in connection with a string of robberies that left two people dead. A poor Black man living in Alabama, Hinton was unable to independently afford an attorney or mount a vigorous defense. Convicted and sentenced to death, Hinton would spend the next 28 years fighting for his freedom and his life.

Book Reviews