Tag: <span>reconstruction era</span>

“White Rage” by Carol Anderson examines the reality that Black efforts at progress and achievement are often met with resistance and a retrenchment of obstacles. Since the Civil Rights Movement and especially during riots, much has been made of Black people angrily lashing out against injustices and a lack of access to resources. Instead of focusing on the issues that lead to protests and riots, greater attention is often placed on what’s referred to as “Black rage” and calls for adherence to respectability politics. But looking back through American history, Anderson examines America’s historic and present “White rage”, the systemic oppression of Black progress.

Book Reviews

“They Were Her Property” by Stephanie Jones-Rogers discusses the role that White women played in the institution of slavery. It’s pointed out that so often, in part because of patriarchy, White women are not perceived as having played an active role in slavery. This is because White women were also subjugated by the patriarchal society of the time and did not have voting rights or other basic civil and civic rights that were afforded to men. But as we see throughout history, and is explained here in this book, an individual or group of people being oppressed does not mean that they themselves are incapable of oppression.

Book Reviews

“Black Fortunes” by Shomari Wills tells the story of the first six Black Americans who became millionaires in the years following slavery. It serves as a mini-biography for each individual, giving insight into their early life and then detailing the path they took to accumulate their wealth. For the most part, the book linearly tells each person’s story but jumps back and forth between the subjects as the book moves through the years.

Book Reviews

“Jubilee” by Margaret Walker is a work of historical fiction that primarily tells the life of a biracial enslaved woman. To a degree, this is a generational story as we learn about the life of Vyry, her mother Hetta, and Vyry’s children. But Vyry is the glue that binds the whole story together. Her life spans the antebellum period, the Civil War, and Reconstruction, giving some insight into all three of those periods.

Book Reviews

A profile of the Reconstruction Era which began a few years before the end of the American Civil War and extended about a decade after its end. From 1863 to 1877 the federal government intervened in the South to clarify and defend the rights of the newly freed as well as to set guidelines for readmitting Confederate states to the Union and their establishment of new governments. With the federal government under the control of Radical Republicans (aka Radical Reconstructionists) new amendments and progressive changes were made to clarify citizenship and expand civil rights.

Black History Feature